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Well just hitting a few under arm shots like really giving them a good hit, if you do that a few times it should break in your bat.

You can normally tell when you come in form with the bat :p weather it is broken in or not. Hit the nets and youll be able to tell soon enough.
 

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Knocking-in your bat...

Ok, you can get the face 'rolled' (also known as 'pressed') at a cricket store, however that will NOT complete the process of knocking-in your bat.
You will still need to spend several hours knocking-in the edges & toe of the bat with (either) an old ball or a mallet.
Personally I'd recommend doing the WHOLE bat - not just the edges & the toe.

Once you think you've done enough work on it, do that same amount again! You can never be too careful when it comes to protecting the investment you've made. Plus, a good bat will just get better with age - if you take care to knock it in properly in the first place.

Once you really think it's ready, take your bat to the nets & have someone bowl a few slow/meds to you. Once you've hit a few, have a look at the face of your bat. If you see seam marks from the ball imprinted on the wood, you need to knock it in some more.
NB: DO NOT hit a new ball at full pace with your bat until you're 110% certain that it's fully ready.


For more info see:
Untitled Document

You'll find that all the manufacturers say the same type of thing...
MRF Bat Care
Cricket Store MRF


Twice now, I've rushed a bat into action thinking to myself 'It'll be ok - surely I've given it enough work?!'
... & twice I've wound up regretting it.


Just remember that patience & persistence are the key.
Hope this helps :cricket:





Ar54ad said:
i had got a bat from pakistan and it needed knocking in and is there any other way i can knock it in without using a mallet and how can i tell when it has been knocked in
 

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No worries, Ar54ad. You're most welcome.

You'll only need bat oil (aka: Linseed oil) if your bat is NOT a poly armour bat (ie: unless it has a protective plastic-like coating).

If your bat does need oiling, be very careful not to over oil it. You'll do more damage to a bat by over oiling it. 5 (or so) light coats is all that's needed initially. I use my hand to apply the oil, just so that I can ensure that oil is applied evenly.
Then, if you're using it regularly, 1 very light coat per season following that.
If you're not using it regularly then you'll only need to apply 1 very light coat every couple of seasons.




Ar54ad said:
What do you need the bat oil
 

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By saying "light coats" I mean using about a shallow palm-full on the face, edges, & toe.
Or, in other words, just enough to lightly moisten the wood.

Cool..? :)



Ar54ad said:
What do you mean by saying 'light coats'
 
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