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Jonny Wilkinson believes he still has a "lot more to give" England despite questions over his place for the first time in a 10-year Test career.

"Everything is finite," he told BBC 5 Live ahead of Sunday's game in Italy.

"I am here for as long a time as possible but more importantly as good a time as possible. That is what is driving me on at the moment.

"I want to express myself, but not the way I did last week. I am learning a lot and feel I've a lot more to give."

The celebrated fly-half, already England's record points-scorer, needs just four more points to pass the 1,000 mark in a white jersey, and 35 more to pass Neil Jenkins' all-time Test record for his country and the Lions.


You don't want to be a recognisable part of why things might have gone wrong at a certain time

Jonny Wilkinson
But after his role in last Saturday's second-half implosion against Wales, the clamour for Danny Cipriani, heading a clutch of talented young English number 10s, to be given his head has grown.

"I have always been one for taking a harsh view on myself in terms of what more I could possibly have done and what I could have done better," said Wilkinson, who will win his 67th cap in Rome.

"You take every loss with a degree of disappointment and a hit to your ambitions and desires.

"You never get over that feeling, but I don't really want to get over it. I want to embrace it because that is what you moves you on quickest in your development, and knowing you are a better player for it.

"Don't get me wrong, there is nothing you want less than losing games when you are in a good position.

"You don't want to be a recognisable part of why things might have gone wrong at a certain time. But you do everything for the same reasons you have done everything all your career, and you maybe got it wrong this time.


606: DEBATE
Wilko must be thanking his lucky stars as Hodgson is the form 10 and we have a host of up and coming 10s.

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"It happens for whatever reason. You take it personally but it is there to be learned from."

Wilkinson believes that, just as the 2003 World Cup-winning side went through several painful defeats en route to global glory, the current side will benefit from last Saturday's Twickenham trauma in the long run.

"It was difficult to take but an enormously positive lesson for us going forward," he added.

"I am glad it has happened at this stage in our development rather than in the World Cup semi-final that we just had.

"If I need to learn from it more than the rest of the team for the things I have been involved with then great, that is all the better for me.

"I am blessed with that lesson and hopefully I can turn up a better player next week."


It is not a one-man game and it is that sense of collective responsibility that we are trying to engender

Brian Ashton

England head coach Brian Ashton believes there has been too much focus on Wilkinson's calamitous pass to Cipriani, and that the 28-year-old Newcastle stand-off "is still the best man to be on the field at the start of the game".

He has urged the rest of the team to take "collective responsibility" rather than relying too much on Wilkinson.

"It is very easy to single one player out and by his own admission Jonny would say that wasn't the best half of international rugby he has ever played," Ashton told BBC Radio 5 Live.

"But other people have got to take responsibility too. It is not a one-man game and it is that sense of collective responsibility that we are trying to engender in the squad.

"It would be so easy for me to make a knee-jerk reaction to what happened in that second half. But I am not that sort of person.

"If you look at the game overall, there were more positives than negatives despite the fact that we lost it."
 
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